Winter 2004 2005 Poultry Press << Previous - Next >>

Ducks and Geese
Urge Pier 1 Imports to Stop Selling Duck Feathers


Photo By: Gary Kaplan

Many duck feathers and down used in products such as pillows and comforters come from ducks who are killed for meat. (Feather products also come from ducks who are plucked alive.) Maple Leaf Farms raises ducks for meat in confined and filthy conditions. Ducks receive water only in the form of nipple drinkers – water trickles out of a pipe and does not allow the ducks enough water to immerse themselves, including their eyes, to maintain good health. Deprived of water to immerse themselves in, ducks develop eye infections and other diseases. Many farms also cut the ends of the ducks’ bills off to prevent the feather pulling linked to the impoverished environment. The ducks suffer miserably, and are tortured to death by the same process as chickens and turkeys in the slaughter plants.

Pier 1 Imports sells pillows and comforters stuffed with feathers from Eurasia Feather Company, a subsidiary of Maple Leaf Farms – the largest duck producer in the US, raising/slaughtering 14 million ducks per year. The duck feather portion of Maple Leaf Farms accounts for 15 to 18% of their business.

  • Let Pier 1 Imports hear about the cruelty they are supporting. Ask them to cease using feathers from Eurasia Feather Company and not to sell comforters or any other products stuffed with feathers. Remind them that using synthetic materials is a far kinder way of doing business. Since Pier 1 Imports already sells many products that use synthetic materials, they know these products are comfortable and marketable. Contact:

Pier 1 Imports
301 Commerce Street
Fort Worth, TX 76102 USA
Toll-free: 1-800-245-4595

  • Order Ducks Out of Water. This powerful 5-minute video by Viva!USA takes you inside today’s factory-farm duck sheds in the United States. VHS format is available from United Poultry Concerns. $10 (includes shipping).

For information on Maple Leaf Farms, visit www.vivausa.org/campaigns/ducks/ducks.html

 

 
Winter 2004 2005 Poultry Press << Previous - Next >>